Medical Receptionists, what’s your superpower?

Medical Receptionists often wear many hats. You may be really great at one or two things in your office.  You may be known for very specific strengths that set you apart from your colleagues.  It is important to always understand the strengths of the people you work with.  Having similar training and past work history does not guarantee that you all will excel in the same area.  Having a  diverse set of skills is helpful to the practice and to each other.  You may handle busy phones lines very well.  This task alone may fluster some of your coworkers.   However,they may be great at managing an abundance of patients checking in at once.  You may have people on your team who communicate more efficiently with your clinical staff than you do.  It is important to understand each others strengths and appreciate when someone else’s expertise or contribution makes a positive difference in how your office runs on a daily basis.  Teamwork works well you know why it matters.  It is also just fine to compliment and thank your coworker and accept gratitude when it comes your way.

Are you your own brand? 

Today we hear so much about branding and marketing and it usually relates to business not Medical Receptionists.  If you think of yourself as your own brand you may be more easily able to stand out during the more difficult times at work.  You will be more forth coming with solutions and suggestions.  What do you think?  What do you think of your work performance? Are you living up to the standards that you set for yourself.  Have you been meeting your own expectations in regards to your conduct, organization, and communication with patients?  Would you hire YOU?  There really is no competition in healthcare, it is about how a collective team of people work together to create an environment that is professional, accepting, patient friendly, and offers a great level of quality to patients and clients.  Focusing on your efforts doesn’t mean you are doing a disservice to anyone else, it just means that you recognize the importance of your role and are truly aware of the value of your contribution.  

If you were a brand, think about the qualities you would want your brand to have.  Would you want your brand to be late to events, disorganized and rude? I doubt it.  You would want your brand to be consistent and demonstrate passion for the industry. You would want for your brand to eventually be a leader in the industry.  How do you create that? Your brand has to solve problems to be successful, your brand has to understand the needs of the customer.  Thinking in these terms allows you to easily understand how you, as a brand, can positively or negatively effect your medical office.  Use your strengths to encourage cohesiveness and learn from others who have a different dominant skill.  You may always be the king or queen of fixing paper jams but that doesn’t mean you can’t improve your other clerical and customer service skill set over time.

So tell us, what’s your superpower? 

 

For more from Medical Receptionist Network visit www.medicalreceptionistnetwork.com. 

Interested in Medical Receptionist Success Training Course for your office? Visit our website or email info@medicalreceptionistnetwork.com. 

Medical Receptionist Handbook to Success now available on Amazon

Medical Receptionists and Patient Interaction

 

Medical Receptionists often have this natural ability to remain calm, professional, and supportive of their patients’ needs.  What if you find those abilities to be more challenging.  Basically, you struggle when patients become upset or dissatisfied, or perhaps you become very defensive or taut during interactions with your clientele.  There is no perfect way to handle certain situations that arise within your office and at the front desk but you can make a difference with your response, reaction, body language and overall demeanor.    One of the most important pieces of advice is to not take it personally.  it is often hard to separate yourself and your feelings from your job responsibilities.  When you have a passion for what you do, you may find it very unnerving when people are not happy with the service and address you directly about it.  On the other hand, if you are not passionate about what you do but work very hard to complete your responsibilities you may be more likely to find yourself on the defense.

How can you keep calm during challenging situations?

Listen-Before you make any assumptions.  Giving your undivided attention during a patient interaction can be very indicative of the potential outcome.

Take Notes-This generally applies if the patient has a complaint or an issue that you must share with another colleague such as a manager or physician.  You want to make sure they have enough information to take corrective actions.  It also improves the communication and reduces the chance of the patient having to repeat the entire situation again.  Lastly, it allows your management or provider the ability to resolve any concerns and be prepared in the event they have to speak directly with the patient.

Express Understanding-Always let your clients know that you understand.  You may not “know how they feel” but you can understand their point, their concern, or their grievance.  Ask how you may help them have a better experience.  Let them know that you will have the situation reviewed by management if needed.

Get Assistance-If you have been working in an office long enough you learn when to recognize a patient who is being abusive or rude.  You know what acceptable behavior looks like for your practice setting.  If you feel threatened or unable to positively respond to a patient it is your responsibility to request help or a witness.  Have management step in when needed.  Do not provoke an unhappy patient.  Remain professional and calm.  You will have more success when you are thinking clearly.

Focus on Solutions-Whenever you encounter a problem in the office you should immediately consider ways to solve it.  Instead of being engulfed with the negative aspects of the issue or the attitude of parties involved, do your best to offer ways to mitigate, resolve, or be supportive in the situation.  This works well with patients and coworkers.  When a fire starts you try to put it out, not spread it.  It only takes one person to be the change. If you can deal with adverse situations without taking things personal you will have a much more fulfilling career.

Most interactions within the medical office are quite cordial, professional, and without many complications.  It is when something does take a turn for the worst or becomes an unusual occurrence that you must be prepared to handle what comes in your direction.  “You are the Bridge” and you have the opportunity and deserve to make the best of every day.

Visit www.medicalreceptionistnetwork.com and join our community on FacebookThe Medical Receptionist Handbook to Success is available on Amazon.